Monday, June 18, 2012

Bundle into Leveson

MPs of a certain type like to whip up problems which don't exist, don't they?

Remember when Nadine Dorries, the poster girl for Conservative MPs who don't get out much, claimed that some of her colleagues were suicidal at the height of the expenses scandal? We didn't get much evidence of this claim, though it underlined the reputation of some backbenchers for being 'outliers' of a wider unease about members of the press daring to shine lights into the Westminster village.

From Dorries to Gove, a leap of some imagination which might be hard to stomach before breakfast. The cerebral Michael Gove is the Education Secretary who talks and acts like it's still the back to basics era 1990s Conservative Government of whom he's a part, wanting to strengthen the national curriculum so as to introduce poetry by rote, time tables by the hour and Latin lessons from an early age. Now I'm in favour of re-introducing foreign languages in schools - it was a daft idea by Labour to scrap compulsory lessons - it's just everything else about Gove that makes me feel uneasy. It's conservatism with a big C and slight sneer, and when he's not making teachers reach for the anonymous blogs, he's making Lord Leveson reach for the coffee.

Gove and Leveson didn't quite hit it off, to put it mildly. Just as Dorries tried to suggest that revealing the truth about expenses was somehow a bad thing because MPs were feeling their collars, Gove has tried to imply that Leveson is putting freedom of speech under trail. The Daily Mail which broke the story has followed it up with more soundbites from Tory MPs, including the self-styled libertarian Douglas Carswell. The result of all this is to add, in a drip-drip style of hints, allegations and suggestions, that the Leveson recommendations will be placed on a high shelf or within tall grass. This might not surprise more cynical readers, and "questioning David Cameron's sincerity" isn't exactly difficult.

I'm reminded of Tony Blair's attitude towards Lords Reform, taking his friend Roy Jenkins' Lords Reform and throwing it into quicksand. Cameron may well be doing the same with the press inquiry, sending out people like Gove to hint about his true intentions. As much as Leveson has been illuminating, MPs tend not to like bright lights shone amongst the darkest shadows.

Gove might think that the consequences to freedom of speech are 'chilling', but that's only because he's looking at the issue from the wrong way round. The lack of respect in this field encouraged the press to run feral and politicians to hide behind locked doors. Gove shouldn't be criticising the process by which improvements are made to the machine; if sausages look grim whilst being made, look away until they turn up on a plate at breakfast, Mr Gove!

I'm not so fresh faced and naive to think that all will be well after Leveson. The relationship between the press, politicians and police will always be intertwined as much as before. But most people observing Leveson has seen green shoots of improvement throughout the processes, and would be knocked back further away from taking politicians seriously (and that's not exactly registering high on any marker of late) if the end result of this is business as usual.  The press went far beyond what was expected in the pursuit of stories, and far beyond what was expected in their relationship with elected officials. If Leveson changes this attitude amongst those estates that are - and are not - answerable to voters, Mr Gove need to celebrate rather than snipe.

Remember, Gove, that freedom of speech was under threat by Labour's constant attacks on civil liberties, and it was the formation of the Coalition which was supposed to safeguard personal freedoms. If Leveson was just a smokescreen, I fear Cameron didn't really want you to blow so hard that we could see through the fog.