Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Gangbanged

Following a Daily Mail witch-hunt/campaign and the Conservative MP Claire Perry's "Independent Inquiry" into online child protection (see the very good post from Ministry of Truth about defining the words 'independent' and 'inquiry' in this context), the UK is one step closer to State approved Internet censorship. The proposed law is now available to view, with its innocuous enough title of the "Online Safety Bill".

I was born in the distant 1980s, making my relationship with adult material follow the usual path of "blissful ignorance", "Late night Channel 4", "dog eared copies of Whitehouse", "copied VHS passed on from a friend of a friend's friend" and then "Internet access" somewhere around early teenage-dom. If you don't know 'Eurotrash' with the sound turned down and a quilt underneath the door, you don't know the eagerness with which boys of a certain age wanted to see subtitled naughtiness.

That level of smut is a world removed from the Internet age, in which people of all ages are one Google search away from seeing all manner of explicit bits, bops and fiddling about. There is almost no taste or fetish for which a website exists, and the popularity of YouTube-style amateur upload sites makes it all the easier for a couple (or a lone bloke feeling a bit frisky) to show the world how they're feeling for about...five minutes (three if, you know, it's been a hard day at work and I'm tired and this bed isn't very comfortable and...anyway.....).

As we all know, the Internet cannot be censored, making every innocent search for the latest news headlines or an amusing cat picture one click away from Roxxie Thrust-McKenzie having her way with two garage mechanics....

...No, sorry, the Internet can be censored to a degree already, with parental controls and filters. As with most things in life, forbidden fruit is thought to taste better, which is how most teenagers end up smoking, trying weed, drinking cider in a park or trying to view naughty images on line. Forget to change Google's image search to "safe" is enough to reveal Page 3 models showing their assets, after all. "Opt in" systems for any kind of assumed adult material has all the practicality of attempting to stop office workers from playing Minesweeper. The point being - if grown adults decide to filter/control Internet access under their own roofs, they can do.

Suggesting that the Internet should be censored or blocked in some way often comes from those "in the know" who choose to ignore that 'temptations' can also incorporate video footage of hostage beheading, graphic CCTV footage of car crashes or the 9/11 attacks. Graphic footage of Premier League footballers having their legs broken during play can be on YouTube or Daily Motion within fifteen minutes of it happening. These graphic examples are often dismissed or ignored by advocates of Internet policing, an attitude which differentiates between violence and sex, but not between different kinds of erotica. The lie - "It's about making the Internet safe for children" - is retold enough times to suggest that no middle ground possibly exists between "free for all" and "State approved content". Are certain lobby groups unable to suggest out loud that parents might be to blame for children searching for XTube? Or are MPs ignorant to how the Internet is navigated beyond blogs and Twitter?

Of all the worrying/facepalm inducing sentences in Perry's report is the recommendation that - " The Government should also seek backstop legal powers to intervene should the 
ISPs fail to implement an appropriate solution. " If private companies won't deal with Internet access, then the State is going to have to haul them to court! That'll teach them to know their own customers, control mechanisms and processes! It's almost as though there's wilful blindness going on...

There is much to debate about the pornography industry itself - from what viewing explicit material might do to a person over a long-period to safeguarding the wellbeing of those who choose to participate in the industry. Parents have a responsibility to educate their children to whatever extent they feel comfortable doing, a stance which might put me on the opposite side of the room to Harriet Harman. (If there's any view I hold which puts me with Harman, I might have to consider medication). As user generated content websites prove, there's only so much of a moral crusade pressure groups can inflict across cyberspace to defeat the great Porn Demon - humans will always feel sexual urges and some will feel comfortable in sharing their acts amongst an audience. The all encompassing "opt in" will do nothing to stop shadier/un-registered parts of the industry from exploiting the vulnerable or abused, it will only make the Morality Police feel better about themselves. That rush of self-congratulation might soon fade if the "opt in" accidentally blocks ordinary material (as some mobile phone blocks incorporate Facebook and Twitter) or accidentally ignores potentially arousing images (such as tabloid newspaper's favoured roll call of flashed knickers, bikini beach shots and the like).

"Opt in" adult content will not make the Internet cleaner, or teenagers less likely to share dirty photos through text messages or BBM/MSN. Whilst it's easier to deny freedom of thought than it is to research why sexual content is so popular to view/share/experience, the State is much more comfortable getting its groove on, and for that, we're all left drowning in a deeply unsatisfactory wet-patch.