Saturday, January 07, 2012

This is London, sponsored by...

The BBC is in a financial bind. Since the election in 2010, the licence fee has been frozen (effectively cut) and both Welsh network Sianel 4 Cymru and the World Service has been brought under its funding responsibilities. Less money, stretched so far, means serious consequences. We almost lost 6Music, and they've only gone and axed Something For The Weekend.

Critics of the Beeb always trot out the line "What about showing adverts or go subscription?", the former of which is now to become a reality. If all goes to plan, the BBC is to broadcast adverts on BBC World Service programmes for the first time.

Auntie's neutrality means last night's coverage of this news was as measured as it could be. The phrase "thin end of the wedge" was used only in quotation. There's probably plenty within the Corporation who think exactly that. Adverts on the BBC? Well, there's a path now taken and there's the destination and doesn't it look NICE? All warm and fluffy and neon lit with advertising types raising their glasses and beckoning us all inside.

The World Service is the most iconic of all the networks prefixed with the letters 'BBC'. Its legacy is stunning - getting news to places where it was otherwise filtered through genuinely bias sources, if indeed the news ever got to people at all. Famously, Mikhail Gorbachev heard of the 1991 coup in the Soviet Union through the Russian language World Service broadcasts.

The BBC is required to source £3m funding from commercial activities by 2014. Adverts can only be the start - and pessimists are meeting with realists to paint what that must mean for the television channels we take pretty much for granted today. Unlike its other radio networks, the World Service is not merely news and opinion; for millions of people, it's the voice of reason, neutrality and wisdom they are denied at home. It is often the only credible news source they can access all day. Adverts may be necessary because of the new funding rules - but the consequences can only be damaging. The inclusion of commercial messages between BBC programming was always the 'scare story' used to shore up support for the licence fee; the scare story is now coming true.

If you're angry about the inclusion of adverts on the World Service (which isn't funded by the licence fee, or at least not yet), step away from the Daily Mail website. Its commentators have rubbed themselves to an awkward, disappointing orgasm over this story - "The arrogance of the Bunch of Boring Creeps...." groans one. "I'm sure I'm not the only one who's tired of paying for left wing biased programming I neither watch or agree with." faps another. "It's about time these Socialist parasites funded their own programming." tugs away one more.  Good old Daily Mail - for whom 'you don't know what you've got till it's gone' should be a secondary by-line. Wait until it /has/ gone, DM faithful, you'll be left with Channel 4 and product placement during the Archers (now broadcast on Virgin Nostalgia).

The "thin end of the wedge" will weaken, compromise and ultimately kill off most of what makes the BBC World Service so important and crucial as a provider of news. Successful adverts will promote the Government to force the Beeb to add commercials onto national television; and with it goes the licence fee and ultimately everything commercial companies would not dare risk paying for. Goodbye to BBC Four, 6Music, the archives of plays and interviews and live music. The World Service was a beacon - it should not be allowed to transform into a billboard.