Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Rage against the X-Factor

Iron Maiden did it. But then again, so did Bob The Builder. And moreover as much as it can be accepted that some damn good pop songs have come from the race to get to Christmas Number One - that oh so British tradition - how many times can a person actually listen to "I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day" before blood begins to seep through the ears?

Invariably associated with novelty songs and faded celebrity, the nature of Christmas Number One has changed over recent years. Yes, it is still more to do with different PR companies attempting to race each others fax machines, although in more cases than not, the same companies can often be involved in the race even if the media-led rivalry appears a genuine battle between different groups.

It's always been about the chart place rather than the music, of course. Well, unless you actually really like "Merry Xmas Everybody". Try hearing it in the middle of June. Go on, put it on Spotify in August, then see how good it is to sing "Here's to the future now....." in the middle of Aldi. At least the reality TV explosion has, in a strange round-a-bout fashion, attempted to make the focus of the chart battle actual songs...

This year's battle is between yet another winner of the X-Factor, and Rage Against The Machine. Older readers may recall the battle in 2000, when Bob The Builder outsold Eminem to take the "top spot" of Number One at Christmas way back then. It was a similar media-led event; both records were hyped to the hills one everything from BBC Breakfast News to questions in the House of Commons. In the end, Bob beat Eminem and the world didn't end.

Cliff Richard is the man whose rule over the Christmas charts was once without question, although this has all come to end once he played his best (and most cynical) card to date; putting the Lord's Prayer to the tune of "Auld Lang Syne" reeks of Cowell-level commercial interests. Barmy and brilliant, the evangelical community bought it up by the Ark-load.

This year, the X-Factor winner has one of the weakest ever "winner's songs", in "The Climb". It sounds like a parody record. Indeed I have known worse Eurovision records than "The Climb", and that includes the Swiss entry from 1994. And the Luxembourg entry from 1989. And for that matter, the Hungarian entry from 1995. While hundreds of thousands of "The Climb" have been bought and downloaded, many hundreds of thousands more of "Killing in the Name Of..." have been purchased in retaliation. This could be the most "credible" song to hit number 1 at Christmas since the 2003 surprise winner "Mad World" from Donnie Darko. Before that, we're looking at the absolute classic "Saviour's Day" from 1990. No, I mean it. One of the best songs ever written, and I'm not a Christian. Come on - the melody, the lyrical flow, the lyrics....No? Just me...?

Maybe, just maybe, the race for Christmas Number One really has been a joke on the entire British nation. No other country does it. Not even the Americans, and by-and-large, Americans are mental. Whatever makes Britain turn into month-long chart speculators I do not know; it really cannot be just about the songs that make it. It must be about the spirit of the underdog, wanting the one-hit-wonders and no-hit-makers to have their little place in music history. There's always be a little place in my heart for the commercial radio weather girls who find themselves as a new entry at number 124, or the one-time big star reduced to hoiking her Christmas single around every daytime sofa-show for the one big chance of a top-30 "comeback".

I fully support the "Rage Against The X-Factor". If Lordi can win Eurovision, and if Iron Maiden can themselves get "Bring Your Daughter..." to Christmas Number One, then the time has come for another national two-fingered salute to the expected and the assumed. Let us remember that Joe from the X-Factor has an entire life-time to churn out (or have churned out on his behalf) endless Westlife covers. This is the one chance for the sidelined, the leftfield, the alternative, the angry, the sagging-jeans-while-holding-a-skateboard, all of them, to unite against the manufactured schlop of reality TV.

And if anyone else points out that both Rage... and Joe are on the same record label, I may go cuckoo-bananas...It's Christmas. Live a little...

3 comments:

Faye L. Booth said...

And if anyone else points out that both Rage... and Joe are on the same record label, I may go cuckoo-bananas...It's Christmas. Live a little...

Yes, it's tragic when people get a bee in their bonnet over some piffling matter of a piece of entertainment, isn't it...? ;)

Dan said...

I'd also question whether Iron Maiden's 'Bring Your Daughter ... to the Slaughter' was ever a Christmas no. 1. I seem to recall that it got to the top spot in the charts a week after Christmas. Record sales during this week were always traditionally low, and Maiden's record label took advantage of this in order to get it to enter at the no. 1 position (incidently, knocking off your beloved Cliff lol)

rakeback said...

I like the idea a lot. Im so sick of the bubblegum pop music with these talentless kids selling music purely based on their image...Miley Cyrus is the name that comes to mind immediately. I hope they make it to #1.